Teachers


Nomads & emeriti

These itinerant instructors have previously been active in the Seattle community, and may wander back in from time to time.


Seattle is blessed with a wealth of instructors each of whom brings a distinctive perspective and personality to Argentine Tango. Who is the best teacher? Well, actually, it is… you, the student. When it comes right down to it, only you can really teach yourself anything. The key to learning is to find instructors who come closest to explaining and demonstrating things in ways that currently make sense to you, and can teach you the style of tango you are looking for. The key is also to find the instructors who challenge you to think, and rethink what you already know, to help you understand, illuminate, and clarify what your tango means to you.

Note: The instructors’ biographies are self-provided. They should give you a sense of what their teaching styles and emphases are, but one of the best ways to evaluate a teacher’s effectiveness is to actually take a class or two. Try doing the steps and figures their way, even if it may seem counter-intuitive to you. After all, that’s why you’re paying them the big bucks. Another way to find a good teacher is to observe and dance with their students at a milonga. Do their students dance with confidence and enjoyment, or do they dance hesitantly? (Keep in mind, however, that there are practically as many dancing styles as there are dancers, and a hesitation, danced purposefully, is one of the more delicious parts of tango.) However, also keep in mind that bad technique is not a style, and will limit your tango and quality of dance partners if not corrected.

See you on the dance floor!